• ASL 1 Handed Fingerspelling Alphabet

    Fingerspelling is a way of spelling words using hand movements. The fingerspelling manual alphabet is used in sign language to spell out names of people and places for which there is not a sign. Fingerspelling can also be used to spell words for signs that the signer does not know the sign for, or to clarify a sign that is not known by the person reading the signer. Fingerspelling signs are often also incorporated into other ASL signs.

    American Sign Language (ASL) uses the one-handed alphabet however some other sign languages use the two-handed alphabet.


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    ASL 1 Handed Fingerspelling Alphabet


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